Bouncing Back

ONE OF BRITAIN’S MOST VULNERABLE DOG BREEDS BOUNCES BACK

But foreign dogs and handbag dogs are most in vogue

New registration statistics released by the Kennel Club reveal that the Skye Terrier, which is one of the most vulnerable of Britain’s native dog breeds – and more rare than the Giant Panda – saw one of the biggest increases in puppy registrations in the first quarter of 2014.

The Kennel Club Breed Registration Statistics show a ten-fold increase in puppy registrations in the breed, from just one puppy registration last year to 11 this year. This means that it saw the second largest increase out of 215 breeds, after the Hungarian Puli, which rose by 3000 percent. It is estimated that there are less than 400 Skye Terriers left in this country, making it the rarest of Britain’s vulnerable native breeds, alongside the Otterhound.

The Kennel Club’s list of vulnerable native breeds monitors those native dog breeds whose numbers are below 300 puppy registrations each year, which is thought to be a suitable level to sustain a population. An ‘at watch’ list monitors those between 300 and 450 registrations per annum that could be at risk if their numbers continue to fall. In total there are 25 vulnerable native breeds, including the Cardigan Welsh Corgi, Dandie Dinmont Terrier and Deerhound, and eight ‘at watch’ breeds, including the Pembroke Welsh Corgi.

Other native vulnerable breeds which have done well so far this year include the Irish Red and White Setter, which increased by 104 percent, to 57 registrations and the Cardigan Welsh Corgi that increase by 89 percent to 34 registrations. This is a much needed boost for the Cardigan Welsh Corgi, which alongside its Pembroke Welsh Corgi cousin, are two of the ten breeds that have seen the greatest decline in the last five years.

However, this positive news for some of the vulnerable native breeds is set against a backdrop of ever declining numbers, as foreign breeds and small handbag dogs popularised by celebrities gain increasing popularity.

The shift in fashion, from native to foreign breeds, can be seen in the Kennel Club’s top twenty registered breeds. The French Bulldog, owned by the likes of Jonathan Ross, Reese Witherspoon and Hugh Jackman, has increased by 522 percent since 2008, with 6,990 registrations in 2013. In the first quarter of this year it was the third most popular breed. Five of the top ten breeds in the UK, as measured in the first quarter of 2014, are now from overseas.

The Portuguese Water Dog, owned by Barack Obama, is the eight fastest climber between 2008 and 2013, increasing by 129 percent. The other fastest climbing breeds in the last five years are the Entlebucher Mountain Dog, Bavarian Mountain Hound, Chihuahua (Smooth Coated), Boston Terrier and the Coton de Tulear.

There are now 138 breeds which have originated overseas since the Kennel Club opened its registers in 1874, when there were just 43 breeds.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “We are extremely lucky to have such a rich variety of breeds, from so many different countries, so that people can always find a breed that will suit their lifestyle. It would however be very sad to see some of our oldest and historically most loved breeds disappearing from our streets and parks simply because they have been forgotten and lack the profile of other breeds. Celebrity culture and changing fashions play a greater role than ever before in people’s choice of dog but we urge puppy buyers to consider all of the 215 breeds and choose the one that is truly right for them.”

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1st June 2014
Top twenty breeds and percentage difference between Q1 2014 and Q1 2013

 

Breed Q1 2014 Q1 2013 Q1 2013/2014 change
Labrador Retriever 7228 7437 3% decrease
Cocker Spaniel 4270 4135 3% increase
French Bulldog 2119 1456 8% decrease
German Shepherd Dog 1984 1783 10% increase
Pug 1921 1746 9% increase
English Springer Spaniel 1776 1875 12% increase
Golden Retriever 1447 1531 14% increase
English Bulldog 1353 1398 9% decrease
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel 1287 1297 5% decrease
Border Terrier 1230 1464 1% decrease
Staffordshire Bull Terrier 1160 1217 5% decrease
Miniature Schnauzer 1071 1180 10% decrease
Smooth Coated Chihuahua 1008 982 1% decrease
Shih Tzu 975 1095 9% decrease
Boxer 856 879 9% decrease
Whippet 808 755 6% increase
West Highland White Terrier 807 749 5% increase
Lhaso Apso 788 946 11% decrease
Dogue de Bordeaux 678 718 6% decrease
Dachshund (Miniature Smooth) 579 596 3% decrease

 

Biggest increase in popularity, first quarter of 2014, compared to the same period 2013.

 

  Percentage increase Q1 2014 Q1 2013
Hungarian Puli 3000 31 1
Skye Terrier 1000 11 1
Sussex Spaniel 575 27 4
Slovakian Rough Haired Pointer 450 11 2
Belgian Shepherd (Malinois) 389 44 9
Beauceron 300 4 1
Cirneco Dell’Etna 300 19 1
Chesapeake Bay Retriever 238 27 8
Polish Lowland Sheepdog 200 15 5
Havanese 191 102 35

 

Biggest increase 2008 to 2013

*Bold = those with more than 100 annual registrations in 2013, as below this number shows up as a disproportionately high percentage increase

 

Breed 2013 2008
Greater Swiss Mountain Dog 720 41
French Bulldog 582 6990
Kooikerhondje 560 33
Entlebucher Mountain Dog 500 6
Greenland Dog 400 10
Korthals Griffon 293 55
Beauceron 188 23
Portuguese Water Dog 164 195
Coton De Tulear 159 262
Boston Terrier 156 1447
Bavarian Mountain Hound 150 80
Chihuahua (Smooth Coat) 126 3845
Japanese Akita Inu 115 84
Norwegian Buhund 105 45
Collie (Smooth) 91 82
Korean Jindo 83 11
Maltese 83 1143
Pug 80 8071
German Longhaired Pointer 80 9
Hungarian Wirehaired Vizsla 71 620
Havanese 61 225
Sealyham Terrier 58 68
Foxhound 57 11
Lagotta Romagnolo 48 46
Italian Greyhound 47 231

 

Biggest decrease between 2008 and 2013

 

Breed Percentage Decrease Total 2013 Total 2008
Mexican Hairless (Standard) 100 0 1
Grand Bleu de Gascogne 100 0 19
Azawakh 100 0 1
Belgian Shepherd Dog (Laekenois) 92 1 13
Komondor 88 2 16
Welsh Corgi (Cardigan) 83 14 81
Welsh Corgi (Pembroke) 78 102 464
Ibizan Hound 76 4 17
Australian Silky Terrier 73 11 41
Portuguese Podengo 73 29 108

 

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